Democratic Party Gains Voter Share Despite Voter Registration Maintenance

By Doug Goodman -Founder & Executive Director Nevadans for Election Reform

It may be another month before we know the impact of same-day voter registration during early caucus voting and on caucus day, however, if the February voter registration numbers are any indication, voters wanted to participate.

February was a routine voter roll maintenance month. Normally, with very minor exception, raw numbers and voter share percentages decline across the board. Not this time.

Statewide, in Clark and Washoe counties, in the rurals, and among voters 18 to 34 and over 55 years of age, the Republican Party, Non-Partisan, the American Independent Party, the Libertarian Party, and other minor parties all lost voter share (Non-Partisan gained share in the rurals) while the Democratic Party recorded sizeable gains across the board. Since the processing of same-day caucus registration reportedly is still underway, we have to assume most of the Democratic gain is due to voters registering or changing party affiliation before the caucus so they could participate in the process.

State-Wide

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 444 0.07% 38.34% 0.20%
R -2,989 -0.57% 32.90% -0.04%
NP -2,401 -0.66% 22.61% -0.05%
IAP -1,195 -1.68% 4.40% -0.05%
LIB -467 -2.88% 0.99% -0.02%
Other -724 -5.60% 0.77% -0.04%
Total not D or R 28.76% -0.16

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Clark County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D -3,145 -0.68% 42.00% 0.25%
R -4,494 -1.40% 28.75% -0.04%
NP -4,158 -1.58% 23.47% -0.07%
IAP -1,300 -2.76% 4.16% -0.06%
LIB -452 -4.41% 0.89% -0.03%
Other -686 -7.87% 0.73% -0.05%
Total not D or R 29.25% -0.21

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Washoe County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 2,755 2.76% 35.61% 0.48%
R 514 0.50% 35.83% -0.31%
NP 590 0.95% 21.75% -0.09%
IAP 18 0.14% 4.46% -0.04%
LIB -17 -0.47% 1.26% -0.02%
Other -21 -0.67% 1.09% -0.02%
Total not D or R 28.56% -0.17

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Rural Counties

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 834 1.84% 22.48% 0.08%
R 991 0.96% 51.12% -0.28%
NP 1,167 3.06% 19.17% 0.29%
IAP 49 0.43% 5.58% -0.06%
LIB 2 0.09% 1.13% -0.02%
Other -17 -1.61% 0.51% -0.02%
Total not D or R 26.39% 0.19

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

18 – 34 Year Old

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,046 0.63% 39.45% 0.51%
R -1,306 -1.40% 21.62% -0.16%
NP -1,520 -1.12% 31.63% -0.14%
IAP -505 -2.54% 4.55% -0.09%
LIB -258 -3.50% 1.67% -0.05%
Other -347 -7.00% 1.08% -0.07%
Total not D or R 38.93% -0.35

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and other

55+

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 15 0.01% 38.34% 0.08%
R -610 -0.22% 41.12% -0.01%
NP -188 -0.18% 15.46% 0.00%
IAP -332 -1.17% 4.15% -0.04%
LIB -82 -2.63% 0.45% -0.01%
Other -126 -3.71% 0.48% -0.02%
Total not D or R 20.54% -0.07

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

By district voter share changes.

Congressional Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 0 4 0
Republican 2 2 0
Non-Partisan 3 1 0
IAP 4 0 0
LIB 4 0 0
Other 4 0 0

In all Congressional districts (100 percent of the districts) the number of voters not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Senate Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 0 21 0
Republican 17 3 1
Non-Partisan 14 6 1
IAP 20 0 1
LIB 20 0 1
Other 21 0 0

In 16 districts (76.19%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. This is a decrease of one.

State Assembly Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 2 40 0
Republican 35 6 1
Non-Partisan 24 18 0
IAP 39 1 2
LIB 38 0 4
Other 38 1 3

In 34 districts (80.95%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. This is a decrease of two.

The end of March numbers should provide the total impact of the Democratic Party’s registration efforts leading up to the caucus, including same day registration. They will also give us another look at the impact of automatic voter registration. We’re also less than three months from the start of early voting for the state and local primaries and the implementation of same-day registration for all elections.

Debates. Debates, Debates ! SUU Joins the Debate Frenzy

The Southern Utah University (SUU) student organizations also got caught up in the debates frenzy of this politically unpredictable election year. The Student organized Michael O. Leavitt Center for Politics and Public Service hosted a debate between Socialist, Democratic and Republican party elements of the student body at SUU.

Tom Cloward a member of the Leavitt Center executive council served as the debate moderator. Cloward is in his first year at SUU studying history. He is from South Ogden, Utah. He loves comedy and making others laugh and understand things just a little clearer. His main political interests include foreign policy, wildlife conservation, and health care.

Tanner Faddis, a fellowship intern and first year student at SUU served as co-moderator.

 

 

Taking the stage are the debaters:

Savannah Robinson, also a member of the Leavitt Center executive council, took the debate stage represented the Democratic party. Savannah is a junior philosophy major from Las Vegas. Some political topics she is passionate about are civil rights, gun control, and mental health. She completed a study abroad during the spring 2019 semester in Greece. After college she plans on attending law school to continue her studies.

 

 

 

Sam Cook, a senior majoring in philosophy and history, represented the Socialist party.

The Republican party was represented by Nick Piedmonte, a senior majoring in political science.

 

 

 

 

The debates centered on the following questions:

“Should the U.S. fund foreign wars?”
“Should the U.S. participate in the Paris Climate Agreement.?”
“Should the U.S.’s immigration system be changed?”
“Should student debt be forgiven?”

The audience was encouraged to provide feedback by determining the winner via an app (like in Iowa?). While some of the audience saw Cook as the clear winner of the debate, many were surprised when Piedmonte was declared the winner of the debate.

The Leavitt Center debate was refreshing in that the usual rhetoric, name calling and tribal nonsense we find so often in our politically charged world was kept to a minimum. The issues while debated with some passion, were discussed within the boundaries of reason and civility.

Please view the full debate here:

Legislative Session Ends – Major Party Voter Share Down

By Doug Goodman -Founder & Executive Director Nevadans for Election Reform

Last month we asked if the political maneuvering during the legislative session would drive voter share of the major political parties down. Based on the voter registration numbers for June 2019 just released by the secretary of state, that could be the case.  

Across all tracked demographics; Statewide, Clark County, Washoe County, rural counties, among younger and older voters, both the Democratic and Republican Party lost voter share. The only exception, the Democratic Party held steady among those 18 to 34 years of age. At the same time, Non-Partisan gained share among all demographics and the minor parties (Independent American, Libertarian, and others) were mixed, either holding steady or gaining.

Raw growth was not any kinder to the major parties. Their percentage of growth lagged behind Non-Partisan and the minor parties. The highest rate of growth was seen by the Independent American and Libertarian parties.

State-Wide

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 3,073 0.52% 38.06% -0.01%
R 2,054 0.39% 33.55% -0.06%
NP 2,785 0.81% 22.11% 0.06%
IAP 602 0.88% 4.41% 0.01%
LIB 153 0.97% 1.01% 0.00%
Other 16 0.12% 0.86% 0.00%
Total not D or R 28.39% 0.07

 Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Clark County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 2,708 0.60% 41.78% -0.02%
R 1,526 0.48% 29.30% -0.05%
NP 2,245 0.91% 23.02% 0.06%
IAP 483 1.08% 4.15% 0.02%
LIB 124 1.26% 0.92% 0.01%
Other 7 0.08% 0.83% 0.00%
Total not D or R 28.92% 0.09%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Washoe County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 318 0.33% 34.92% -0.02%
R 299 0.29% 36.85% -0.03%
NP 350 0.59% 21.32% 0.05%
IAP 61 0.49% 4.47% 0.01%
LIB 14 0.40% 1.28% 0.01%
Other 2 0.06% 1.17% -0.01%
Total not D or R 28.24% 0.06%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Rural Counties

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 47 0.10% 22.52% -0.04%
R 229 0.22% 51.69% -0.03%
NP 190 0.51% 18.37% 0.04%
IAP 58 0.50% 5.72% 0.01%
LIB 15 0.65% 1.15% 0.00%
Other 7 0.63% 0.55% 0.00%
Total not D or R 25.79% 0.05

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

18 – 34 Year Old

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,019 0.63% 38.45% 0.00%
R 327 0.34% 22.75% -0.07%
NP 1,090 0.83% 31.20% 0.06%
IAP 210 1.10% 4.58% 0.02%
LIB 53 0.73% 1.74% 0.00%
Other -8 -0.15% 1.27% -0.01%
Total not D or R 38.80% 0.07%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and other

55+

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,213 0.48% 38.38% -0.02%
R 1,291 0.48% 41.43% -0.03%
NP 783 0.80% 15.07% 0.04%
IAP 199 0.73% 4.15% 0.01%
LIB 25 0.85% 0.45% 0.00%
Other 15 0.44% 0.52% 0.00%
Total not D or R 20.194% 0.05%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

By district voter share changes.

Congressional Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 4 0 0
Republican 4 0 0
Non-Partisan 0 4 0
IAP 0 4 0
LIB 0 2 2
Other 1 0 3

CD 1, CD 2, and CD 4 (75 percent of the districts) continue to show the number of voters not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Senate Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 16 4 1
Republican 18 1 2
Non-Partisan 2 19 0
IAP 1 16 4
LIB 3 8 10
Other 7 0 14

In 16 districts (76.19%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Assembly Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 28 11 3
Republican 35 4 3
Non-Partisan 4 36 2
IAP 4 31 7
LIB 8 21 13
Other 14 3 25

In 34 districts (81%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

We are now entering the presidential election cycle. The Democratic Party held their first candidate debate. Automatic voter registration approved by the voters in 2018 will be implemented. Beginning with early voting next year, voters will be able to register to vote or update their voter registration when they go to the polls to vote; same-day voter registration signed into law by Governor Sisolak. We don’t know how both these programs will impact voter registration or turnout. We will be watching.