Pre-election activities intensify for the Mesquite City Council Election Contests

Preelection activities continue to intensify in the Mesquite City Council election contests.
On October 18, 2022, Mayor Al Litman hosted a rally for 3 city council candidates seeking a seat on the city council. The political rally was held at the 1880 Grille at the Canestoga Country Club.
Mayor Litman led off the rally with strong endorsements for the incumbents Sandra Ramaker and Karen Dutkowski and also spoke highly of newcomer Pattie Gallo. The candidates then spoke at length about their qualifications and past service on the council or in various capacities to the community. The rally was attended by 150 plus (biggest meet and greet crowd ever – Al Litman) Mesquite voters, who reacted enthusiastically to their speeches and also engaged with the candidates in a Q and A session. The candidates and the mayor then continued to engage the crowd in an extended city subject matters engagement with the rally participants. The exchanges were pleasant and even a few well-placed jokes were bandied about.

For those that were not able to be there, here is the formal video recording of the event with a recap of the candidates, their qualifications and accomplishments.

 

 

 

The Mesquite Chamber of Commerce sponsored a Mesquite City Council candidate debate on October 12, 2022. The candidate debate is presented here for your viewing pleasure.

 

 

 

Litman also introduced Pattsie Brown who is seeking election to the state office of Public Adminstrator: Mayor

Mesquite City Council Candidates Rally at Wolf Creek CC

On September 29, 2022, Mayor Al Litman introduced 3 candidates seeking a seat on the city council. The political rally was held at the Wolf Creek Country Club and Mayor Litman led off the rally with strong endorsements for the incumbents Sandra Ramaker and Karen Dutkowski and also spoke highly of newcomer Pattie Gallo. The candidates then spoke at length about their qualifications and past service on the council or in various capacities to the community. The rally was attended by 100 plus Mesquite voters and who reacted enthusiastically to their speeches and also engaged with the candidates in a Q and A session. The candidates and the mayor then mingled with the crowd in an extended social engagement with the rally participants. The exchanges were pleasant and even a few well-placed jokes were bandied about.
For those that were not able to be there, here is the formal recap of the candidates, their qualifications and accomplishments:

Your vote matters. Your involvement matters. Make sure you are represented in the things that matter to you. What happens in our city is up to you.

VOTE in 22.

Book Review – The Monarchy of Fear

The early rumblings of the 2022 political campaigns call for some serious soul searching including an in depth look at WTF (What the F..)  or HTF (How the F..) did this happen.  Martha C. Nussbaum presents a philosopher look at our current political crisis and the retributive response to fear that has polarized American for the last twenty years.   In the book titled “The Monarchy of Fear”, Nussbaum untangles the web of emotions and fear and articulates the politics of constructive work and hope.

Nussbaum first look at fear begins at the everyone’s beginnings, when we first enter the world and are confronted with unknowns that we can’t understand but only respond with emotional outbursts that apparently always gets someone’s attention.  The author draws from historical and contemporary examples of fear-based motivations and traces likes and dislikes and value assignations to emotional responses to fear.  It is a fascinating read and may upend the world as you know it and understand it and it will take you out of your engrained comfort zone.

Dr. Nussbaum discusses the book at length at a Politics and Prose event at the Bookstore Coffeehouse. Please watch this short video:

 

Martha C. Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Philosophy Department and Law School of the University of Chicago.

Elections 2020 – Its almost Final

The opportunities to put a voice to your choice will be gone in less than ten days. If don’t do it now what will you tell those that will write about it in the history books. What will they say about you if you decide not to be heard.

Is it clear that this is about voting for the good guys or the other guys. You know who they are! There is a lot of real information available.

Lets start with a speech made at Gettysburg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and end with one of the many episodes of the other guys deeds.

Don’t forget that there are others involved and they want you to help them get back into office. By now you know who they are and you know if they live on the bright or the dark side of the moon. Let sunshine always shine on those that have your back especially when you are hurting. This time may be the last time that you will be in a position to save the soul of the nation and the light of the world we still hope to have tomorrow.

Elections 2020 – America’s Most Consequential Election Contests

Elections 2020 – America’s most consequential election contest will be decided in less than two weeks. The election will decide what the future will be for America and also for the world. We witnessed the best and the worst of Americans during this struggle.

However a plague is upon us and for many of us our entire being is focused on the existential matters presented by a pandemic that is raging in the United States and most of the world.

We are again looking at disasters facing us like never before and the dire situation in Utah appears to be only the beginning and an example of what is yet to come. Today, October 19, 2020 in the state of Utah began like the last three weeks with COVID cases in excess of 1,000 per day. COVID deaths have doubled in less than two months. The State of Utah and the Trump administration seem to want to stay the course. No change in plans or better stated:  No plans at all. Utah hospitals are at or above capacity. Hospital ICU units may have to turn away, not just COVID patients, but patients with other potentially fatal conditions.
This drama has been reenacted since February 2020 in almost every state of the United States and in most of the world. Our fight against this pandemic and our climate crisis have not yielded a plan to resolve these critical life and death matters for every human being on our planet.

America and the world is in search of a plan. It is within our power to determine this plan and demand this plan of action to address our health and our ability to continue to thrive in our country and on our planet.
A proposal was made in July 2020.  The proposal outlines the deliverables that will stop our downward spiral into an abyss that will darken our nation for generations to come.

It is we that must enable this plan.  It is we that must demand this plans deliverables.  It we that must work together to execute this plan.    It is all within our power and all we need to do is just say so.  We have less than two weeks to speak up.

Elections 2020 – Nevada’s most consequential election contests.

Notwithstanding the local election contests, the most consequential election contests in Nevada are the congressional races and election races for Justice of the Nevada Supreme Court.

Steven Horsford the incumbent running for the US Congress in the congressional district 4, has served our area for two terms and is seeking a third.  We have recognized Horsford’s dedication to our district and he has served his constituents well in many consequential congressional initiatives and support for congressional actions that protect the rights and freedoms of our Nevada and our country.

We are pleased to have the congressman as our guest on the Mesquite Weekly.

 

Well know for his service to the state during his last two terms in the Nevada legislature and in criminal, civil and judicial law practices and services, Ozzie Fumo is seeking a position on the bench of the Nevada Supreme Court.  Fumo is a professor at the UNLV Boyd School of Law and has practiced law in Nevada since 1996.  He is well qualified and will bring a fair, balanced, reasoned and a non political voice to the rulings that will impact all Nevadans in these most challenging times.  Ozzie Fumo was our guest on the Mesquite Weekly on October 9th. We are pleased to present this interview.    

 

Clark County elections races that we also should pay special attention to,  is for a seat on the Clark County School Board.   Jeff Proffitt is seeking a position as Trustee on the School Board District B.  Proffitt’s election campaign message “kids over politics” is the driver of his campaign.  It is our pleasure to present the Mesquite Weekly interview with Jeff Proffitt.

Democratic Party Gains Voter Share Despite Voter Registration Maintenance

By Doug Goodman -Founder & Executive Director Nevadans for Election Reform

It may be another month before we know the impact of same-day voter registration during early caucus voting and on caucus day, however, if the February voter registration numbers are any indication, voters wanted to participate.

February was a routine voter roll maintenance month. Normally, with very minor exception, raw numbers and voter share percentages decline across the board. Not this time.

Statewide, in Clark and Washoe counties, in the rurals, and among voters 18 to 34 and over 55 years of age, the Republican Party, Non-Partisan, the American Independent Party, the Libertarian Party, and other minor parties all lost voter share (Non-Partisan gained share in the rurals) while the Democratic Party recorded sizeable gains across the board. Since the processing of same-day caucus registration reportedly is still underway, we have to assume most of the Democratic gain is due to voters registering or changing party affiliation before the caucus so they could participate in the process.

State-Wide

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 444 0.07% 38.34% 0.20%
R -2,989 -0.57% 32.90% -0.04%
NP -2,401 -0.66% 22.61% -0.05%
IAP -1,195 -1.68% 4.40% -0.05%
LIB -467 -2.88% 0.99% -0.02%
Other -724 -5.60% 0.77% -0.04%
Total not D or R 28.76% -0.16

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Clark County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D -3,145 -0.68% 42.00% 0.25%
R -4,494 -1.40% 28.75% -0.04%
NP -4,158 -1.58% 23.47% -0.07%
IAP -1,300 -2.76% 4.16% -0.06%
LIB -452 -4.41% 0.89% -0.03%
Other -686 -7.87% 0.73% -0.05%
Total not D or R 29.25% -0.21

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Washoe County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 2,755 2.76% 35.61% 0.48%
R 514 0.50% 35.83% -0.31%
NP 590 0.95% 21.75% -0.09%
IAP 18 0.14% 4.46% -0.04%
LIB -17 -0.47% 1.26% -0.02%
Other -21 -0.67% 1.09% -0.02%
Total not D or R 28.56% -0.17

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Rural Counties

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 834 1.84% 22.48% 0.08%
R 991 0.96% 51.12% -0.28%
NP 1,167 3.06% 19.17% 0.29%
IAP 49 0.43% 5.58% -0.06%
LIB 2 0.09% 1.13% -0.02%
Other -17 -1.61% 0.51% -0.02%
Total not D or R 26.39% 0.19

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

18 – 34 Year Old

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,046 0.63% 39.45% 0.51%
R -1,306 -1.40% 21.62% -0.16%
NP -1,520 -1.12% 31.63% -0.14%
IAP -505 -2.54% 4.55% -0.09%
LIB -258 -3.50% 1.67% -0.05%
Other -347 -7.00% 1.08% -0.07%
Total not D or R 38.93% -0.35

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and other

55+

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 15 0.01% 38.34% 0.08%
R -610 -0.22% 41.12% -0.01%
NP -188 -0.18% 15.46% 0.00%
IAP -332 -1.17% 4.15% -0.04%
LIB -82 -2.63% 0.45% -0.01%
Other -126 -3.71% 0.48% -0.02%
Total not D or R 20.54% -0.07

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

By district voter share changes.

Congressional Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 0 4 0
Republican 2 2 0
Non-Partisan 3 1 0
IAP 4 0 0
LIB 4 0 0
Other 4 0 0

In all Congressional districts (100 percent of the districts) the number of voters not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Senate Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 0 21 0
Republican 17 3 1
Non-Partisan 14 6 1
IAP 20 0 1
LIB 20 0 1
Other 21 0 0

In 16 districts (76.19%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. This is a decrease of one.

State Assembly Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 2 40 0
Republican 35 6 1
Non-Partisan 24 18 0
IAP 39 1 2
LIB 38 0 4
Other 38 1 3

In 34 districts (80.95%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. This is a decrease of two.

The end of March numbers should provide the total impact of the Democratic Party’s registration efforts leading up to the caucus, including same day registration. They will also give us another look at the impact of automatic voter registration. We’re also less than three months from the start of early voting for the state and local primaries and the implementation of same-day registration for all elections.

Debates. Debates, Debates ! SUU Joins the Debate Frenzy

The Southern Utah University (SUU) student organizations also got caught up in the debates frenzy of this politically unpredictable election year. The Student organized Michael O. Leavitt Center for Politics and Public Service hosted a debate between Socialist, Democratic and Republican party elements of the student body at SUU.

Tom Cloward a member of the Leavitt Center executive council served as the debate moderator. Cloward is in his first year at SUU studying history. He is from South Ogden, Utah. He loves comedy and making others laugh and understand things just a little clearer. His main political interests include foreign policy, wildlife conservation, and health care.

Tanner Faddis, a fellowship intern and first year student at SUU served as co-moderator.

 

 

Taking the stage are the debaters:

Savannah Robinson, also a member of the Leavitt Center executive council, took the debate stage represented the Democratic party. Savannah is a junior philosophy major from Las Vegas. Some political topics she is passionate about are civil rights, gun control, and mental health. She completed a study abroad during the spring 2019 semester in Greece. After college she plans on attending law school to continue her studies.

 

 

 

Sam Cook, a senior majoring in philosophy and history, represented the Socialist party.

The Republican party was represented by Nick Piedmonte, a senior majoring in political science.

 

 

 

 

The debates centered on the following questions:

“Should the U.S. fund foreign wars?”
“Should the U.S. participate in the Paris Climate Agreement.?”
“Should the U.S.’s immigration system be changed?”
“Should student debt be forgiven?”

The audience was encouraged to provide feedback by determining the winner via an app (like in Iowa?). While some of the audience saw Cook as the clear winner of the debate, many were surprised when Piedmonte was declared the winner of the debate.

The Leavitt Center debate was refreshing in that the usual rhetoric, name calling and tribal nonsense we find so often in our politically charged world was kept to a minimum. The issues while debated with some passion, were discussed within the boundaries of reason and civility.

Please view the full debate here:

Legislative Session Ends – Major Party Voter Share Down

By Doug Goodman -Founder & Executive Director Nevadans for Election Reform

Last month we asked if the political maneuvering during the legislative session would drive voter share of the major political parties down. Based on the voter registration numbers for June 2019 just released by the secretary of state, that could be the case.  

Across all tracked demographics; Statewide, Clark County, Washoe County, rural counties, among younger and older voters, both the Democratic and Republican Party lost voter share. The only exception, the Democratic Party held steady among those 18 to 34 years of age. At the same time, Non-Partisan gained share among all demographics and the minor parties (Independent American, Libertarian, and others) were mixed, either holding steady or gaining.

Raw growth was not any kinder to the major parties. Their percentage of growth lagged behind Non-Partisan and the minor parties. The highest rate of growth was seen by the Independent American and Libertarian parties.

State-Wide

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 3,073 0.52% 38.06% -0.01%
R 2,054 0.39% 33.55% -0.06%
NP 2,785 0.81% 22.11% 0.06%
IAP 602 0.88% 4.41% 0.01%
LIB 153 0.97% 1.01% 0.00%
Other 16 0.12% 0.86% 0.00%
Total not D or R 28.39% 0.07

 Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Clark County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 2,708 0.60% 41.78% -0.02%
R 1,526 0.48% 29.30% -0.05%
NP 2,245 0.91% 23.02% 0.06%
IAP 483 1.08% 4.15% 0.02%
LIB 124 1.26% 0.92% 0.01%
Other 7 0.08% 0.83% 0.00%
Total not D or R 28.92% 0.09%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Washoe County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 318 0.33% 34.92% -0.02%
R 299 0.29% 36.85% -0.03%
NP 350 0.59% 21.32% 0.05%
IAP 61 0.49% 4.47% 0.01%
LIB 14 0.40% 1.28% 0.01%
Other 2 0.06% 1.17% -0.01%
Total not D or R 28.24% 0.06%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Rural Counties

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 47 0.10% 22.52% -0.04%
R 229 0.22% 51.69% -0.03%
NP 190 0.51% 18.37% 0.04%
IAP 58 0.50% 5.72% 0.01%
LIB 15 0.65% 1.15% 0.00%
Other 7 0.63% 0.55% 0.00%
Total not D or R 25.79% 0.05

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

18 – 34 Year Old

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,019 0.63% 38.45% 0.00%
R 327 0.34% 22.75% -0.07%
NP 1,090 0.83% 31.20% 0.06%
IAP 210 1.10% 4.58% 0.02%
LIB 53 0.73% 1.74% 0.00%
Other -8 -0.15% 1.27% -0.01%
Total not D or R 38.80% 0.07%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and other

55+

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 1,213 0.48% 38.38% -0.02%
R 1,291 0.48% 41.43% -0.03%
NP 783 0.80% 15.07% 0.04%
IAP 199 0.73% 4.15% 0.01%
LIB 25 0.85% 0.45% 0.00%
Other 15 0.44% 0.52% 0.00%
Total not D or R 20.194% 0.05%

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

By district voter share changes.

Congressional Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 4 0 0
Republican 4 0 0
Non-Partisan 0 4 0
IAP 0 4 0
LIB 0 2 2
Other 1 0 3

CD 1, CD 2, and CD 4 (75 percent of the districts) continue to show the number of voters not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Senate Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 16 4 1
Republican 18 1 2
Non-Partisan 2 19 0
IAP 1 16 4
LIB 3 8 10
Other 7 0 14

In 16 districts (76.19%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Assembly Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 28 11 3
Republican 35 4 3
Non-Partisan 4 36 2
IAP 4 31 7
LIB 8 21 13
Other 14 3 25

In 34 districts (81%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

We are now entering the presidential election cycle. The Democratic Party held their first candidate debate. Automatic voter registration approved by the voters in 2018 will be implemented. Beginning with early voting next year, voters will be able to register to vote or update their voter registration when they go to the polls to vote; same-day voter registration signed into law by Governor Sisolak. We don’t know how both these programs will impact voter registration or turnout. We will be watching.

Non-Partisans Will Decide Who Wins in November as Major Party Voter Share Falls

With less than two months before the close of voter registration for the general election, it is becoming apparent neither the Democratic nor Republican Party control the outcome. That honor belongs to those voters registered as Non-Partisan.

An analysis of the voter registration numbers for August 2018 show both major parties losing significant voter share while Non-Partisan registered corresponding gains. The rate of growth for Non-Partisan also over-shadows that of the major parties with the Libertarian Party also showing large growth.

In 15 districts (71.14%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. There was no change from June.

State-Wide

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 9,513 1.69 38.40 -0.05
R 7,535 1.51 33.84 -0.10
NP 8,398 2.70 21.40 0.18
IAP 1,272 1.40 4.39 -0.02
LIB 360 2.47 1.00 0.01
Other 7 0.05 0.95 -0.02
Total not D or R 27.74 0.15

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Clark County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 8.876 2.07 42.01 -0.10
R 5,959 1.96 29.66 -0.10
NP 7,469 3.31 22.33 0.22
IAP 1,171 2.00 4.13 -0.02
LIB 308 3.33 0.91 0.01
Other 15 0.15 0.95 -0.02
Total not D or R 28.32 0.19

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Washoe County

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 682 0.76 35.22 -0.05
R 846 0.88 37.38 0.00
NP 672 1.29 20.40 0.08
IAP 91 0.52 4.48 -0.02
LIB 29 0.89 1.27 0.00
Other 2 0.06 1.25 -0.01
Total not D or R 27.40 0.05

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

Rural Counties

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D -45 -0.10 23.05 -0.14
R 730 0.74 51.86 0.12
NP 257 0.76 17.72 0.05
IAP -3 -0.03 5.71 -0.03
LIB 23 1.09 1.11 0.01
Other -10 -0.93 0.55 0.00
Total not D or R 25.09 0.03

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

18 – 34 Year Old

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 4,663 3.18 38.47 0.03
R 2,039 2.27 23.34 -0.19
NP 4,435 3.85 30.35 0.22
IAP 728 2.67 4.60 -0.02
LIB 236 3.54 1.75 0.01
Other 21 0.36 1.49 -0.04
Total not D or R 38.19 0.17

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

55+

Party Change in # Voters % Change % Voter Share Difference in Voter Share %
D 2,243 0.92 38.90 -0.09
R 3,394 1.32 41.29 0.06
NP 1,388 1.52 14.68 0.05
IAP 238 0.80 4.12 -0.01
LIB 34 1.22 0.45 0.00
Other -2 -0.06 0.56 -0.01
Total not D or R 19.81 0.03

Other includes Green Party, Natural Law Party, and others

By district voter share changes.

Congressional Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 4 0 0
Republican 3 1 0
Non-Partisan 0 4 0
IAP 3 1 0
LIB 0 4 0
Other 4 0 0

CD 1and CD 2 continue to show the number of voters not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties.

State Senate Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 20 1 0
Republican 14 7 0
Non-Partisan 1 20 0
IAP 14 6 1
LIB 2 10 9
Other 18 0 3

In 15 districts (71.14%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. There was no change from June.

State Assembly Districts

Party # Districts Lose Voter Share # Districts Gain Voter Share # Districts No Change
Democratic 38 2 2
Republican 26 16 0
Non-Partisan 1 40 1
IAP 26 12 4
LIB 11 23 8
Other 36 3 3

In 31 districts (73.81%) the number of voters registered as Non-Partisan or the total number not affiliated with either major party is greater than or within 5% of the number of voters registered to one of the major parties. There was no change from June.

Monthly changes in excess of one-tenth of one percent (0.10) are significant. Changes of nearly one-quarter of one percent (0.25) are rare. Yet we see type of swings in several places through the tracked demographics. If this trend continues through to the close of voter registration in October, the outcome of key races should be interesting.